ICE arrests rose 37% since Donald Trump took office

ICE arrests rose 37% since Donald Trump took office

ICE arrests rose 37% since Donald Trump took office

Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced on Wednesday that arrests of suspected undocumented immigrants are up 37.6% compared to this time in 2016. The agents arrested 30,028 over a similar period between January 24 and April 30 last year-amounting to a 37.6 percent increase year-over-year.

Acting ICE director Thomas Homan said the statistics released Wednesday show that agents still prioritize lawbreakers: 30,473 criminals were arrested from January 22 to April 29, an 18 percent increase from the same period in 2016.

Immigrants with criminal records arrested by ICE usually "understand that what we are doing is just a byproduct of the acts they committed", said Jorge Field, acting deputy director of enforcement and removal operations for ICE in Los Angeles.

About 75 percent of those arrested during the period were convicted criminals, with offenses including homicide, sexual abuse and drug-related charges.

Non-criminal arrests also increased by more than double since 2016; ICE arrested nearly 11,000 aliens in the country illegally in Trump's first 100 days compared to just 4,000 previous year, the agency said.

Google launches "Smart Reply" for Gmail
Google says a Spanish version will be available in the couple weeks as well with more languages "coming soon". What's the point of it? A Google spokesperson told BuzzFeed News, "No one is reading your email".

Under former President Barack Obama, only immigrants who were involved in gangs or had been convicted of a felony or several misdemeanors were considered deportation priorities.

While arrests of immigrants targeted by agents rose, the number of deportations fell 12 percent during the period, Homan said. Many sanctuary cities have directed their local law enforcement not to cooperate with detainer requests. Trump has reversed some Obama immigration policies and has said that anyone who is in the United States illegally could face deportation. The arrest sent shockwaves through the largely immigrant community north of downtown Los Angeles. "We are a nation of laws, and ignoring orders issued by federal judges undermines our constitutional government". ICE will take action to remove individuals subject to a final order by a federal immigration judge. Convicted criminal arrests increased about 20 percent from a year ago, to 12,766.

Other examples highlighted by advocates include an Indian taxi driver in Southern California recently arrested during a routine check in with immigration authorities and a Mexican man facing deportation after almost two decades in the U.S. Jose Luis Sanchez-Ronquillo, who was living in MI, is being held in a Louisiana detention facility while lawyers try to block his deportation.

Already some cities are seeing the effect - Houston has seen a 40 percent drop in the number of reported rapes during Trump's first few months in office, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Customs and Border Protection determined he didn't have permission to enter, and sent him to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to be sent home.

Related news