Qualcomm: Apple is pressuring contractors in patent dispute

Qualcomm: Apple is pressuring contractors in patent dispute

Qualcomm: Apple is pressuring contractors in patent dispute

Qualcomm says it's already filed a separate claim against Apple directly for "unlawful interference" with its licensing agreements.

Qualcomm claims that Apple agreed to cover any monetary damages its suppliers incur for refusing to pay royalties and potentially breaching their contracts with Qualcomm. So far there has not been any comment from Apple or the companies mentioned in the latest lawsuit, but things are definitely turning ugly and pretty fast.

The legal dispute has come to a head today with the news that Qualcomm has sued four of Apple's biggest manufacturing partners over the non-payment of royalties. He likened the resistance to pay for the use of Qualcomm technology to someone walking into an Apple shop and refusing to pay full price for a smartphone. The companies make iPhones and iPads for Apple. As per Qualcomm, Apple is demanding an unreasonable below-market direct license and is supposedly increasing the pressure through these manufacturers. They have continued to pay royalties for using Qualcomm's patents in non-Apple products, the filing said.

Qualcomm noted in its statement that the suppliers have still not disputed their contractual obligations to pay the royalties, which could give the company some ammunition in its lawsuit. Qualcomm says the agreement between itself and the manufacturers was made before Apple sold its first iPhone, and that it is not a party to any of the agreements.

Qualcomm said on Wednesday it filed a complaint against Foxconn and three other contract manufacturers of Apple for not paying royalties.

John McCain: Trump Scandal Nearing "Watergate Size and Scale"
Ralph Abraham of Alto said he would like to see Comey testify before Congress and that he will go into it with an open mind. Other people familiar with Comey's style of working told CBS News they fully expect more Comey memos exist.

Over the past eight months, Qualcomm's patent licensing business has been under fierce attack by anti-monopoly regulators and technology giants including Apple, Samsung and Intel.

"We are suing to get our money", Rosenberg said. Qualcomm could file a case with the Commission to block sales of infringing devices in the United States, which would likely stop sales of any current or future iPhone models in the US.

Earlier, Apple had instructed the four companies not to pay while it litigated a patent fight - which includes lawsuits in the US, China, and England - against Qualcomm.

"What they are saying is Apple is not paying us, so we are not paying you, and Apple has told us not to pay you", said Rosenberg.

Related news