Delphi Joins With BMW-Intel-Mobileye

Delphi Joins With BMW-Intel-Mobileye

Delphi Joins With BMW-Intel-Mobileye

The latest came Tuesday, when BMW, Intel, and Mobileye announced that global supplier Delphi Automotive would join their efforts to develop and deploy self-driving vehicles by 2021.

In July a year ago, Intel, Mobileye and Intel had announced that they were going to work jointly on autonomous vehicle technology with the goal of making fully autonomous vehicles available for series production by 2021.

Delphi may also provide hardware components such as sensors and is already working together with Intel and Mobileye in the areas of perception and sensor fusion, the companies said.

"The partnership between BMW, Intel and Mobileye continues to break new ground in the auto industry", said Intel CEO Brian Krzanich.

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The partnership aimed to "develop solutions" for the automotive market and "potentially other industries", it added.

Of special note: "this engagement between Delphi and [the other three partners] is non-exclusive". But to produce level 3-5 autonomous vehicles-meaning the vehicles can at the least make their own decisions to speed up and change lanes and at the most can be designed for full automation with no human, pedals, or steering wheel necessary-involves complicated technology and systems. This comes after a July 2016 announcement that Intel, BMW, and Mobileye would be joining forces for autonomous vehicles - with Delphi, the dream of self-driving cars takes another step closer to reality. In less than one year the joint teams have made substantial progress to deliver a scalable platform for autonomous driving and are on the path to deliver 40 pilot cars in the second half of this year. Delphi announced its intentions to spin off its powertrain division into a separate company earlier this month, leaving the remaining entity to focus on advanced-connected and autonomous-driving ventures.

BMW already uses Mobileye's chips and cameras to collect mapping data for autonomous driving and has agreed to allow data to be merged with information collected from competitors' fleets.

In March, Intel Corp. announced it will spend more than $15 billion to acquire Mobileye NV.

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