House Democrat: 'We need new leadership'

House Democrat: 'We need new leadership'

House Democrat: 'We need new leadership'

"I think it's a mistake if you think that candidates around the country are going to be cookie-cutter replicas", Ferguson told Business Insider. "That would be very bad for the Republican Party - and please let Cryin' (Senate Minority Leader) Chuck (Schumer) stay!" "Nancy Pelosi is not the only reason that Ossoff lost".

Commenting on the Democrats' electoral failure in the South this week, which included a South Carolina House race, Hot Air blogger Andrew Malcolm observed that one-third of Pelosi's 193 House Democrats now come from just three states, "the usual liberal suspects of California, New York and MA, not the crucial Heartland".

Republican candidate Karen Handel consistently labeled Democrat Jon Ossoff 'Nancy Pelosi's handpicked candidate'. Democrats need to pick up 24 House seats to retake the majority.

The San Francisco Chronicle reported in 2006 the "three dirty words" were in vogue as Democrats threatened to retake the House, elevating Pelosi to the speaker position.

Trump himself weighed in over Twitter Thursday morning with digs at Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of NY. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., and the vice chair of the Democratic National Committee.

"I think there was consensus within the room that there are other members within the caucus who feel just like we do", Vela told CNN.

In a letter to Democrats late Wednesday, Pelosi insisted majority control of the House is up for grabs.

"The issue I think strategically is that Trump energizes their base and Leader Pelosi energizes their base", said Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, who was unsuccessful past year in trying to unseat Pelosi.

"One of the disappointing things from the last couple days is that that approach has a little bit of punch to it, it still moves voters", Ryan said. Democratic strategist Rodell Mollineau, the co-founder of the consulting firm Rokk Solutions, says anti-Trump resistance is enough for the time being. "She has been a great leader, but like every leader, time immemorial, it's time for people to know when to go", Rice said.

Said Rice: "The Republican playbook has been very successful".

Some Democrats, though, have wanted her out, particularly after the party was unable to win back control in 2016, a year when the party was seen as having a decent chance of doing so.

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Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.

The focus on Pelosi comes in part because she's the only figure in Democratic politics who is universally known and detested on the right.

Pelosi's potential successors have included former Rep. Rahm Emanuel - but he left the House to become Obama's chief of staff and later to run for mayor of Chicago.

Soon, Democrats will have to decide whether they think they'd do better in next year's midterms by moving to the center or to the left - essentially, by winning converts or punishing heretics.

When the top post among House Democrats might open up, though, Pelosi hasn't said. The overall messaging of the Democratic Party - more anti-Trump than pro-solutions - is also being criticized.

And for some, they point to questions about how their leaders, and Pelosi in particular, have fallen short in crafting an economic message that can counter Trump and yield election victories. If elected, I will not vote for Nancy Pelosi for speaker.

Democrats had entered the 2017 special elections expecting to ride the wave of opposition to Trump - hoping his low approval ratings, popular-vote loss and now-persistent allegations his campaign team colluded with Russians to influence the election would translate to Democratic support at the polls.

Republicans' ability to effectively use Pelosi as their bogeyman in Georgia was especially stark when contrasted with the Democrats' tactics there. Most recently, Tom Price resigned in February to join Trump's administration.

It deals a serious blow to Democratic momentum and prime evidence that their money won't buy a win against Trump.

Schale said that in a district as red as Georgia's sixth, Democrats need the "perfect candidate" - someone who fits their constituents, rather than a "generic" progressive candidate.

Democrats were hesitant to attack the President in such a historically heavily Republican district.

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