Wall Street ends off lows as traders buy North Korea dip

Stocks are ending broadly lower on Wall Street, led by declines in technology companies and banks, two of the highest-performing sectors over the previous year.

Apple (AAPL.O) pared gains after rising as much as 1.91 percent to an all-time high and provided the biggest boost to all three indexes, while healthcare stocks such as Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N) were the biggest weight on the S&P.

SALES SLUMP: J.C. Penney sank 17.8 percent after the struggling department store chain reported quarterly results that fell short of Wall Street's expectations.

Earlier this week, Trump said the U.S. would unleash "fire and fury" on North Korea if it continued to threaten the U.S. North Korea has announced a detailed plan to launch a salvo of ballistic missiles toward the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam, a major military hub and home to U.S. bombers.

Wall Street's widely followed measure of market anxiety, the CBOE Volatility index, was up 0.79 points at 16.77 on Friday, its highest since November.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 82.37 points, or 0.37 percent, to 22,002.97, the S&P 500 had lost 8.34 points, or 0.34 percent, to 2,466.58 and the Nasdaq Composite had dropped 38.99 points, or 0.61 percent, to 6,331.47.

It was the biggest daily fall on the FTSE 100 since April 18 this year when the market lost 180 points.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.20 percent.

To stop BJP's 2019 march, Opposition parties to meet in Delhi today
He said that this could be done through effective strategy and taking up of pro-people issues such as the agrarian crisis. Gandhi said the party would win on the basis of its achievements. "We are not the B-team of the Congress".

"With the North Korean authorities taking the heat off the nuclear threats, we expect the market pressure to cool off, as long as the US President also manages to read "truce" between the lines". Wholesale gasoline was little changed at $1.62 a gallon, heating oil rose 2 cents to $1.65 a gallon and natural gas rose 6 cents to $2.88 per 1,000 cubic feet.

About 6.48 billion shares changed hands on US exchanges on Wednesday compared with the 6.16 billion average for the last 20 sessions. Its shares slid $9.77, or 5.3 percent, to $174.02.

Ongoing global glut concerns lingered in oil markets despite a bigger-than-expected draw in U.S. crude inventories, leaving prices volatile. It added 39 cents to $49.56 a barrel overnight.

Sterling was also down 0.1% versus the euro at 1.104.

Traders saw the chance of a rate hike in December fall to 40 percent from 42 percent shortly before the release of the data, according to Federal funds futures. The index dropped to a one-month closing low.

Frankfurt's DAX 30 was also down, shedding some 0.8 percent. Earlier in Asia, Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 slipped less than 0.1 percent, while Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 1.1 percent.

"As a portfolio manager, you say, 'Do I think we'll get a war out of this?' " said Torsten Slok, chief worldwide economist at Deutsche Bank, referring to the bluster between North Korea and President Donald Trump.

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