Kentucky mayor says Confederate statues should go after violence in Virginia

Kentucky mayor says Confederate statues should go after violence in Virginia

Kentucky mayor says Confederate statues should go after violence in Virginia

The mayor of Lexington, Kentucky, Jim Gray, is taking swift action to remove two Confederate states from the lawn facing a court house in the wake of yesterday's violent and tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia, CBS News has reported.

The events of Charlottesville, apparently, moved him to announce earlier than he planned to.

Rallies and marches in support of yesterday's victims and refuting the message of hate and violence expressed by the white supremacists are taking place across the US. "But we will also be able to add additional signage to give the statues the appropriate context and explain how they came to be and what was going on in Lexington at that time". Today, the mayor of Lexington, Kentucky issued a statement about the Confederate statues in his own city.

August 12, 2017The tragic events in Charlottesville today have accelerated the announcement I meant to make next week.

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The two monuments honor Lexington native John C. Breckinridge, a former United States vice president who became the final war secretary of the Confederacy, and John Hunt Morgan, a Confederate general who raised the "Lexington Rifles" and died in battle.

Dark's declaration comes following a day of viciousness was started in Charlottesville after racial oppressors dissented the evacuation of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a recreation center.

Although it was a slave-holding border state, more Kentuckians actually served in Union regiments than Confederate ones during the U.S. Civil War, but historical revisionists would have you believe that the entire state stood behind the Confederacy.

Ideally, the statues would be destroyed instead of just relocated, but I understand that might be a tough sell.

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