Iran nuclear deal: How Trump's plan to pressure Tehran could play out

Iran nuclear deal: How Trump's plan to pressure Tehran could play out

Iran nuclear deal: How Trump's plan to pressure Tehran could play out

Every 90 days the president has to notify Congress as to whether he believes Iran is complying with the accord and if the lifting of sanctions is in the interest of the American people.

Trump, who has been sharply critical of Iran and accused Tehran of working with North Korea on lethal weapons, faces an October 15 deadline on whether to certify to Congress that Iran is compliance with the terms of the nuclear agreement.

On Wednesday, head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Ali Akbar Salehi said that Iran is considering "various scenarios" in response to Trump's "probable withdrawal" from the worldwide nuclear deal.

News reported the White House briefed lawmakers Wednesday on the pending decision and those who left were convinced the Obama-era nuclear deal would get decertified.

Two other USA officials, who also requested anonymity, said Trump's bellicose rhetoric on a number of fronts is troubling both many of his own aides and some of America's closest allies, a few of whom have asked US officials privately if Trump's real objective is attacking Iran's nuclear facilities.

What is Trump expected to say or do about the deal?

Zarif also told lawmakers that Iran "will never renegotiate" the deal, according to a report on the semi-official Fars news agency. Engel, the top Democrat on the Foreign Affairs Committee, said unwinding the agreement would send a risky signal to allies and adversaries alike. Murphy said he hoped that if the president does decertify the deal, that Congressional Republicans would refuse to put sanctions back on Iran. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley have said the U.S. interprets the agreement differently than the other countries involved. The Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 is a bipartisan piece of legislation that was overwhelmingly passed by Congress before being opposed -- but eventually signed - by President Obama.

In exchange, UN, US and European Union sanctions were to be gradually removed from Iran.

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What follows after de-certification of deal? "Once it was entered into, once it was implemented, we want to see it enforced".

The other signatories to the JCPOA - the UK, France, Germany, Russia, China and Iran, have said it is not realistic to try to renegotiate its terms.

"Either the [nuclear agreement] will remain as-is, in its entirety, or it will no longer exist", Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said last month at the United Nations. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., would demand that the intelligence community produce judgments on a wide range of Iranian behavior that is not covered by the nuclear deal, including ballistic missile testing and development and threats to Israel and the Mideast more broadly.

On Wednesday, head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Ali Akbar Salehi said that Iran is considering "various scenarios" in response to Trump's "probable withdrawal" from the global nuclear deal.

"A failed certification would be the first step to unraveling the Iran nuclear deal and taking us to a new, devastating war of choice in the Middle East".

Trump threatened during the presidential campaign to tear the pact up if he was elected.

Second, Trump could call for greater non-nuclear sanctions on Iran as it seeks to punish the regime without violating the deal. Those provisions relate to enriching uranium to levels near those needed to produce the fuel for a nuclear weapon, as well as other activities that limit Iran's atomic capabilities at various sites. Many Democrats believe that is more likely to happen if Congress does not act to make changes to the existing agreement.

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