New Facebook Anti Revenge Porn Tool Wants Users To Upload Their Nudes

New Facebook Anti Revenge Porn Tool Wants Users To Upload Their Nudes

New Facebook Anti Revenge Porn Tool Wants Users To Upload Their Nudes

Once the image is sent, Facebook can use technology to "hash" it, which means Facebook creates a traceable digital fingerprint or link. Then the social networking firm, in collaboration with e-Safety, wants the users to upload their intimate photos directly to their messenger.

Australian e-Safety Commissioner, Julie Inman Grant, was at pains to point out that the images would not end up on the social network's servers.

Say... what? Sending your nudes to social media in a bid to prevent your nudes appearing without your consent on social media seems counterintuitive, but Facebook reckons there's a solid plan behind it. With the issue being one of the pressing problems, Facebook has come up with a solution to combat it.

"Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed". The Telegraph reported that to provide the photos directly to Facebook, users should send them through the Messenger app.

My hope and expectation is that Facebook will automate the process as much as possible, but that there may need to be some human involvement to review submitted images. Compromising images that are shared with Facebook will be hashed to create a digital fingerprint which the company can then use to identify the same images if they are uploaded by someone else.

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However, the trial won't completely solve Australia's revenge porn woes, Clare McGlynn, an expert from Durham Law School, told BBC.

Back in April this year, Facebook launched new tools so that users of their platform could flag nude images posted without their prior consent. However, a May report indicated that the social network was "flooded" with cases of revenge porn and sextortion, with almost 54,000 cases of the crime reported in just a month; 33 of which involved children. "Of course, we always encourage people to be very careful about where they store intimate photos and preferably to not store them online in any form".

Facebook is no stranger to revenge porn and explicit content, which is banned on the platform. They would then use artificial intelligence and additional photo-matching technologies to spot the abuse.

"So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded", she added.

After that, it would be up to the company's AI tech to prevent anyone from uploading porn depicting the same person.

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