Facebook wants your nude selfies to combat 'revenge porn'

Facebook wants your nude selfies to combat 'revenge porn'

Facebook wants your nude selfies to combat 'revenge porn'

The social media platform wants its members to preemptively upload their nude and intimate pictures to Facebook for safe-keeping.

Many users who share these types of images or videos online are in favor of this type of content protection.

Australia is one of four countries participating in a limited global pilot with Facebook that will help prevent intimate images of Australians being posted and shared across Facebook, Messenger, Facebook Groups and Instagram.

The scheme is aimed at people who are anxious partners or ex-partners may share the images without their consent - and is being trialled in Australia, the US, Canada and the UK.

If it violates Facebook policies, the company would create a digital fingerprint of the picture so that it could be recognized and blocked if its uploaded again.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", Grant said.

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Facebook's latest attempt to wipe revenge porn off its platform takes an unusual tack: asking users to send in their own nude photos.

The new initiative is now being piloted in Australia in partnership with the Office of the eSafety Commissioner.

The program in Australia is in conjunction with the government's e-Safety Commission, an office dedicated to promoting digital safety, especially for children.

Users would fill out a form before sending the message to themselves using the Messenger app. Facebook said the process involves storing image-matching data, and the photos themselves would not be saved, though they would be reviewed by a trained Facebook team.

On the other hand, eSafety commissioner Julie Inman Grant told AFP, "It removes control and power from the perpetrator who is ostensibly trying to amplify the humiliation of the victim amongst friends, family and colleagues".

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