Air Traffic Controller Accused of Having Weapon of Mass Destruction

Air Traffic Controller Accused of Having Weapon of Mass Destruction

Air Traffic Controller Accused of Having Weapon of Mass Destruction

An air traffic controller at Charlotte Douglas International Airport and another man were arrested Friday on charges related to possessing a weapon of mass destruction. Paul George Dandan, 30, was arrested on November 10 at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport.

According to the Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office, 30-year-old Paul George Dandan was released from jail Saturday morning.

Detectives learned that 39-year-old Derrick Fells build the explosive device. CMPD bomb squad also responded and confirmed that the suspect did in fact have a homemade pipe bomb.

Materials to make a pipe bomb-like device were found at Dandan's residence, but was not assembled, WSOC reported, quoting an unnamed source.

The Federal Aviation Administration told WCNC-TV that Dandan was sacked from his job at Charlotte Douglas International Airport after his arrest.

Officials haven't said exactly what type of device Dandan is accused of owning. Authorities say his airport access only extended to the control tower.

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Dandan, who is also a volunteer with the local fire department, was arrested in 2015 and charged with assaulting a woman. "He did not have access to any aircraft".

WBTV reports that Fells told police that he made the explosive "to use it against a neighbor". Investigators allege that Fells changed his mind and gave away the bomb to Dandan.

Dandan was sacked from his position at Charlotte Douglas International Airport following his arrest, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The FAA confirmed to NBC Charlotte that Dandan's access to the airport was terminated following his arrest Friday afternoon.

Weapons of mass destruction are described by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as any device "designed or intend to cause death or serious bodily injury through the release, dissemination, or impact of toxic or poisonous chemicals, or their precursors".

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