Disneyland shuts down cooling towers after park visitors sickened with disease

Disneyland shuts down cooling towers after park visitors sickened with disease

Disneyland shuts down cooling towers after park visitors sickened with disease

Disneyland shut down two cooling towers in October after people who visited the Southern California theme park were diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease.

The towers were found to be contaminated with Legionella bacteria, according to the Orange County Health Care Agency, as reported by the Los Angeles Times. Of the twelve reported cases in Anaheim, patients ranged in age from 52 to 94.

Please adhere to our commenting policy to avoid being banned. "We conducted a review and learned that two cooling towers had elevated levels of Legionella bacteria", Dr. Pamela Hymel, chief medical officers for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, said in a statement Friday.

Those most at risk of getting sick from Legionella infection include people who are smokers, have chronic lung disease or weak immune systems, and people over the age of 65.

The Legionella bacteria can cause respiratory illness and pneumonia, and especially in older people or those with existing health problems, can result in death.

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There is no known ongoing risk associated with the outbreak, according to Good.

"On Oct. 27, we learned from the Orange County Health Care Agency of increased Legionnaires' disease cases in Anaheim".

The towers are shut down as they are treated with chemicals that kill this type of bacteria.

County authorities were informed by the the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention three weeks ago of several cases of the disease among people who had traveled to Orange County in September. While many people have no symptoms, it can cause serious pneumonia and prove unsafe to those with lung or immune system problems. They report having performed subsequent testing and disinfection and brought the towers back into service November 5, 2017. It can become a health concern when it grows and spreads in human-made water systems like showers and faucets, cooling towers, decorative fountains and water features and so on.

The towers traced to the outbreak were located near the New Orleans Square Train Station, both towers more than 100 feet from public areas.

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